September 9, 2010

College Football Betting Preview: West Virginia Mountaineers vs. Marshall Thundering Herd



West Virginia Mountaineers
(1-0, 0-1 ATS)

Marshall Thundering Herd
(0-1, 0-1 ATS)

West Virginia state bragging rights are on the line in Huntington on Friday night, as the West Virginia Mountaineers and Marshall Thundering Herd will meet in college football betting action.

WVU has its share of problems that it needs to address and address in a hurry if it has any desire of making a BCS bowl game this year. The Mountaineers have a prospective problem in the passing game right now, as QB Geno Smith probably should be doing better than 20-of-27 for 216 yards with two TDs and a pick against a team like Coastal Carolina. The ball just was never forced up the field during a defense that really should’ve had no answers. There is plenty of good to go around as well. WR Jock Sanders did his job to help out his first time quarterback, catching eight passes for 71 yards and a TD. RB Noel Devine made a nice early statement in the Heisman Trophy race, as he put together 23 carries for 111 yards and a TD. The defense also did a fantastic job, even though there should’ve never been a doubt about that. The Mountaineers held the Chanticleers to 186 total yards on the day. Coastal Carolina only went 2-for-14 on third down and had nine first downs to speak of.

Marshall fought tooth and nail against the Ohio State Buckeyes last week, but when push came to shove, it was simply outmatched on both sides of the ball. QB Brian Anderson deserves a ton of credit for doing everything he could to try to move the pigskin on the Buckeyes, but he just didn’t stand a chance, going 17-of-28 for 135 yards with an INT. He faced the wrath of a relentless pass rush all night long that Ohio State had to offer. The rushing attack was shut down as well, as the only man that reached double digits in yards was RB Martin Ward, who had a tame 32 yards on six totes of the ball. The defense was flat out run over as well, something that HC Doc Holliday won’t be tolerating this week in the home opener. The Buckeyes managed a hefty 529 yards of offense on the day. The only score came on a blocked field goal returned for a touchdown, which only seemed to further upset the hosts on the opening night of the season. Ohio State scored the final 31 points of the game from that point forward.

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This Thundering Herd squad is still a year or two away, and Holliday knows it. This is a series that the Mountaineers have historically dominated, and this week shouldn’t be any exception. Devine should run wild, and WVU should post its fifth straight win in this series by at least 17 points.

Selection: West Virginia Mountaineers -13

Congress, extend child tax credit

Inland Valley Daily Bulletin (Ontario, CA) November 29, 2010 | Sheriff Lee Baca Analysts are scratching their heads over recent crime statistics. Crime rates, especially for violent crimes, are falling.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation reports that violent crime in the United States has reached its lowest level in two decades. Most experts agree that stronger and more innovative law enforcement has helped reduce the most violent types of criminal behavior.

You might think that veteran law enforcement leaders are breathing a little easier these days. We’re not.

There is another statistic that gives law enforcement leaders cause for concern. Even as crime rates fall, one of the root causes of crime – child poverty – appears on the rise.

A staggering 15 million children now live below the poverty line, according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau figures. In California, nearly 2million children – roughly one in every five kids – are poor.

That is nearly a 10 percent increase from 2008 to 2009. Nationally, children are more likely to live in poverty than any other age group.

I am particularly concerned about how rising child poverty rates are likely to affect our public safety. Make no mistake: Most children, including very poor children, never become involved in serious crime. But the research does show that growing up in poverty, especially sustained poverty and extreme hardship during early childhood, increases the risk of later involvement in crime. in our site child tax credit 2011

Numerous studies – including a U.S. surgeon general report – show a clear association between high child poverty rates and higher- than-average crime rates.

When household income levels are increased above the poverty line, one study indicates, children from those no-longer-poor homes show significant decreases in the behavior disorders linked to juvenile crime.

Delivering significant tax relief to low-income families can help reduce child poverty – and ultimately reduce crime. Congress can take action before the end of the year by extending the current child tax credit. childtaxcredit2012.net child tax credit 2011

The child tax credit is a benefit for working parents with dependent children. Currently, these families are eligible for a refundable credit – 15 percent of earned income capped at a maximum of $1,000 per child – once they have earned at least $3,000.

If Congress takes no action, this threshold is due to increase from $3,000 to roughly $13,000. The result is quite likely to be that millions of low-income working parents are excluded from receiving the refundable portion of the tax credit or will see the benefit significantly reduced.

Now that midterm elections are over, Congress is beginning to debate the issue of tax provisions, scheduled to expire at the end of the year. While members of Congress may disagree on what should stay and what should go, extending the child tax credit has received considerable support from both parties.

Letting working families who are struggling to make ends meet keep more of their income is a no-brainer. I urge members of Congress to extend the current structure of the child tax credit before it expires Dec. 31.

The stakes are high. Unless Congress acts and extends key provisions of the child tax credit by year’s end, more than 18million children across the country, including nearly 2.5 million in California, will lose these benefits or see the benefits drastically reduced.

By extending the child tax credit, Congress can provide support to working families today – and make our communities safer in the future.

Lee Baca is the Los Angeles County sheriff and chairs the national board of directors for Fight Crime: Invest in Kids, an anti- crime organization of more than 5,000 police chiefs, sheriffs, prosecutors and violence survivors.

This commentary is reprinted with permission from Politico.

Sheriff Lee Baca

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