May 1, 2013

Worst 5 Teams On the MLB Odds on the Road (5/1/13)

It has been a great year for road teams this year, but some of them have just haven’t been able to get off to mark this season. Check out the teams that have been beaten on the MLB odds in the worst way thus far this season.

(Road record and amount of profit based upon a $100 bet listed in parentheses)

Los Angeles Angels (3-11, -$887) – The Angels have been one of the more disappointing teams in baseball this year, and their real struggles have come on the road. This current seven-game road trip is games game out, and there is only one win to show for it. The team couldn’t figure out how to hit the ball in Seattle, scoring a total of three runs in three of the four games, and it hasn’t figured out how to pitch in Oakland, allowing 10 runs in each of the first two games. It also hasn’t helped that LHP CJ Wilson only has one win on the road this year, and RHP Jered Weaver has been on the DL for the past few weeks and hasn’t won a game either home or away on the campaign either. The Halos are a huge mess right now, and they have to be glad to be coming back home starting on Thursday.

Cincinnati Reds (3-9, -$694) – The Reds are becoming a very simple team to handicap right now. You back them when they’re at home, and you fade them when they’re on the road. The good news for Cincy fans is that the team is 12-4 at the Great American Ballpark this year. The bad news is that it only has three wins in 12 games on the road and has the second worst money mark in the league for teams away from home. The Reds have averaged 2.0 runs per game in their last six on the road, five of which have ended in defeat.

Tampa Bay Rays (4-10, -$620) – If you take away the games that were started by LHP Matt Moore on the road this season, the Rays are 1-10 and -$930. We saw the perfect example of what’s wrong with this team on Monday night when Tampa Bay lost a road game against the Kansas City Royals. RHP Alex Cobb was coasting through 5.2 innings, and all of a sudden, he basically imploded on the mound and ended up just getting tattooed for four runs over the course of the next several batters. The normally reliable bullpen for Manager Joe Maddon has been terrible on the road this year, as demonstrated by the three runs that RHP Brandon Gomes gave up in relief yesterday.

Seattle Mariners (4-9, -$515) – When you play at one of the best pitcher’s parks in baseball, it’s easy to see how you can struggle offensively. But in a league where the Houston Astros and the Miami Marlins are fielding de facto Double-A clubs, you can’t rank 29th in the league in run production. Seattle’s problems offensively have come both at home and on the road, and averaging 3.28 runs per game just isn’t going to cut it. The M’s are doing alright at Safeco Field this year at 8-8, but that ugly 4-9 mark on the road is what is plaguing the team at the moment.

Toronto Blue Jays (4-9, -$483) – Just like the Angels, Toronto has been one of the biggest disappointments of the season to date in baseball. Playing at Rogers Centre hasn’t been kind, but playing away from it has been even worse for the team. The Blue Jays have a total of just 35 runs that have been generated in 13 road games this year that didn’t come off of the bat of 1B Edwin Encarnacion, who apparently is the only member of this offense that doesn’t mind hitting the baseball away from the dome in Toronto. This isn’t going to cut it for the year though, and if the Jays don’t get this turned around on the road, they’ll be selling off all of these assets that they just picked up at the trade deadline to get the farm system built back up.

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Adam Markowitz

is a staff writer living in the Orlando area. He has covered NFL, MLB, college football, CFL, AFL, NBA, college basketball, NASCAR, golf, tennis, and the NHL for a number of various outlets in his career, and he has been published by a number of different media outlets, including the Orlando Sentinel and the Wall Street Journal.

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